Webcam

Webcam

Boyd Deep Canyon Desert Research Center

Agave Hill Camera – Currently Disabled due to network Issues.
Coyote Pond – Wildlife Camera

Coyote Pond – Underwater Camera


Support for this project provided by The McAlister Foundation.

Current Location:
Deep Canyon Boyd Center

Coyote Pond Observation Unit

  • Axis 221 day and night camera and outdoor housing
  • Small fan
  • IR Illuminator
  • Pole

The camera is designed for day and night imagery, and it will enable us to determine visitation times and activity patterns of animals at remote sites. The system is currently deployed at a small water hole near the lab buildings at Boyd Center.

Images from the camera will be saved in an image database system. The camera can detect motion and notify a researcher that an event has occurred by emailing the researcher with the current image attached to the email.

Remote observation of wildlife allows researchers to observe animals without the disturbance of a human presence that can alter the normal behavior of an animal. Another beneficial aspect of remote surveillance systems is the savings of time and travel expenses to remote locations by reducing the need for frequent visits to collect data that can be obtained by remote sensing.

Kevin Browne – UCNRS Information Manager

Coyote Pond Observation Unit

  • Axis Communications 0764-001 M7011 Video Encoder/li>
  • SEAMASTER SUPERMINI UNDERWATER VIDEO CAMERA

Pupfish Project


Wikipedia

The camera is designed for underwater day and night imagery. The system is currently deployed at a small water hole near the lab buildings at Boyd Center.

Images from the camera will be saved in an image database system. The camera can detect motion and notify a researcher that an event has occurred by emailing the researcher with the current image attached to the email.

Remote observation of wildlife allows researchers to observe animals without the disturbance of a human presence that can alter the normal behavior of an animal. Another beneficial aspect of remote surveillance systems is the savings of time and travel expenses to remote locations by reducing the need for frequent visits to collect data that can be obtained by remote sensing

Agave Hill Observation Unit

The Agave Hill camera site is located on a promontory 

overlooking the Deep Canyon gorge and floodplain. The site is remote, difficult to access, subject to extreme desert conditions, and heavy wind loads. We chose this site to test the limits of off-the-shelf components deployed in the real world. Our goal is to create a reliable imaging system for use in research, teaching, and management.The Agave Hill camera is a wireless, solar powered system with connectivity to the Boyd Center local area network and the internet. The camera has pan, tilt, and zoom capabilities that can be controlled by any user with an internet connection. We will also create a database for repeat imagery of fixed locations to document seasonal and long-term habitat changes. Opportunistic images can include raptor nesting locations and bighorn sheep activity.

Agave Hill Deployment

We installed a Cannon pan and tilt camera at a location that will give the user the ability to analyze the habitat as well as the wildlife that frequently visit this area. This camera can be controlled by any user with an internet connection. The user has complete pan tilt and zooming control of the camera, which returns a live streaming image to the user’s computer. Remote observation of wildlife and vegetation allows researchers to study the areas without the disturbance that human presence typically causes. It also allows us to minimize our impact on the soil and vegetation in the area. Another beneficial aspect is the time and cost to the researcher that is saved by reducing the need for frequent visits to remote locations that can now be reached through a computer monitor. These camera deployments allow us to provide this information to a much wider audience of researchers, including grade school and high school students.